Next celebrity death

Discussion in 'New Roundtable' started by islstl, Aug 2, 2009.

  1. Winston1

    Winston1 Founding Member

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    Had the unenviable job of following a legendary name Adolph Rupp. Nonetheless he did well.
     
  2. kcal

    kcal Founding Member

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    I was as rupp when dale made his last trip there. they had a nice ceremony before the game to honor dale and joe b re-enacted the famous dale jacket toss

    it was a class thing they did.

    up until a few years ago joe b and denny crum had a daily radio show that was a good listen….
     
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  3. Winston1

    Winston1 Founding Member

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  4. mctiger

    mctiger RIP, and thanks for the music Staff Member

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    Damn....guess I know what I'll be listening to today.
     
  5. COLD SMOKE

    COLD SMOKE Founding Member

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  6. COLD SMOKE

    COLD SMOKE Founding Member

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    Howard Hesseman, Dr. Johnny Fever on ‘WKRP in Cincinnati,’ Dies at 81
    https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/

    We lived in the Lake Charles area from my age of 3 (late 1961) until now. When I was young, there was only an NBC channel in our town. There were CBS and ABC stations in Beaumont and Lafayette that we could watch. Our local news was on channel 7, so we watched NBC Huntley & Brinkley, and then KPLC channel 7 every evening after my father arrived home. I suppose we were a bit lazy because we tended to not change the channel much. Yet I do remember watching WKRP in reruns I suppose at some point. The episode where they dropped the turkeys from the helicopter will never leave my memory. Good Night, Johnny Fever, sleep well.
     
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  7. kluke

    kluke Founding Member

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    The show had terrific writing. "I swear I thought those turkeys could fly". That was one of the funniest moments in television ever. That was a good series. They also did a phenomenal job on the script after the Who concert stampede in Cincinnati when about 10 people were crushed.
    RIP Johnny Fever
     
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  8. Winston1

    Winston1 Founding Member

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  9. Winston1

    Winston1 Founding Member

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    We lost a treasure the other day.
    This from Charlie Sykes in the Bulwark
    remembering P.J. O'Rourke

    "The Democrats are the party that says government will make you smarter, taller, richer, and remove the crabgrass on your lawn. The Republicans are the party that says government doesn't work and then they get elected and prove it." - P. J. O'Rourke.


    P. J. O’Rourke passed away yesterday at the age of 74, which I have come to think of as tragically young.

    I already miss him. He still had so much pomposity left to deflate, idiocy to mock, and humbuggery to lampoon. Just look at the material he had to work with.

    Make sure you read JVL’s heart-felt tribute in today’s Bulwark. Our friend, John Podhoretz, remembers P.J. as America’s greatest satirist and “coolest conservative” (back when that sort of thing was still possible).

    His passing after a short illness is devastating, not only because it robs us of his gimlet eye but because it reduces the store of kindness in the world, which is more precious than rubies.

    It isn’t an exaggeration to say that P.J. was, for a long time, the only cool conservative writer in America. His pieces for Rolling Stone and Harper’s and other mainstream outlets gamely featured his horrified takes on elite cluelessness and liberal-Puritan malfeasance against ordinary American playful fun.

    Politico describes P.J. as “a prolific author and satirist who re-fashioned the irreverence and ‘Gonzo’ journalism of the 1960s counterculture into a distinctive brand of conservative and libertarian commentary.”

    But that hardly seems to do him justice; really, if you haven’t read his stuff, do yourself a favor. Imagine the literary love-child of Hunter S. Thompson and H.L. Mencken… but that also doesn’t really capture him. He was funnier than Mencken and more trenchant than Thompson.

    He was, above all, a master satirist and a fearless wordsmith with no tolerance at all for the bullshit of our times. Here’s a sample from his 1991 best-seller, (and one of my favorites) “Parliament of Whores”:

    “In July 1988, I covered the specious, entropic, criminally trivial, boring stupid Democratic National Convention, a numb suckhole stuffed with political bulk filler held in that place where bad malls go to die, Atlanta.

    “Then ... I flew to that other oleo-high colonic, the Republican convention, an event with the intellectual content of a Guns N’ Roses lyric.”

    You can hear echoes of Twain; and there’s definitely a Mencken-esque vibe. But, in the end, it was quintessentially P.J. O’Rourke. And damn, we really needed his humor to get through what he once described as our “era of idiot populism and hooligan partisanship.”
     
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  10. kluke

    kluke Founding Member

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    Thanks Winston, I agree. It seems we've lost the appreciation of biting, sarcastic, but well written satire. It requires a sense of humor and subtlety which in large part have been replaced by anger and shouting.
     
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