Little Known Facts

Discussion in 'New Roundtable' started by Bengal B, Feb 27, 2014.

  1. Bengal B

    Bengal B Founding Member

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    The names of the see no evil, hear no evil and speak no evil are
    Mizaru, Kikazaru, and Iwazaru
     
  2. Bengal B

    Bengal B Founding Member

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    In Vietnam it is legal to flash your dong.

    The đồng is the currency of Vietnam.

    The đồng has been the currency of Vietnam since May 3, 1978. Issued by the State Bank of Vietnam, it is represented by the symbol "₫". Formerly, it was subdivided into 10 hào, which was further subdivided into 10 xu, neither of which is now used. Since 2012 the use of coins has decreased greatly, and since 2014 coins are generally now not accepted in retail, but will still be accepted in some banks (not all).

    The word đồng is from the term đồng tiền ("money"), a loanword from the Chinese tóng qián (Traditional Chinese: 銅錢; Simplified Chinese: 铜钱). The term refers to Chinese bronze coins used as currency during the dynastic periods of China and Vietnam.

    In 1946, the Viet Minh government (later to become the government of North Vietnam) introduced its own currency, the đồng, to replace the French Indochinese piaster. Notes dually denominated in piastres and đồng were issued in 1953 for the State of Vietnam, which evolved into South Vietnam in 1954. On September 22, 1975, after the fall of Saigon, the currency in South Vietnam was changed to a "liberation đong" worth 500 old Southern đồng.

    After Vietnam was reunified, the đồng was also unified, on May 3, 1978. One new đồng equalled one Northern đồng or 0.8 Southern "liberation" đồng. On September 14, 1985, the đồng was revalued, with the new đồng worth 10 old đồng. This started a cycle of chronic inflation that continued through much of the early 1990s.
     
  3. COTiger

    COTiger 2010 Bowl Pick 'Em Champ

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    Are you really that bored? IconLOL.gif Read Calco's post about San Francisco. Guaranteed to put you to sleep.
     
  4. mctiger

    mctiger closet claustrophobic Staff Member

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    Blondes on average have 50,000 more strands of hair than brunettes or redheads.
     
  5. Bengal B

    Bengal B Founding Member

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    Thanks. I'm going to dye my hair before it gets too thin.
     
  6. Bengal B

    Bengal B Founding Member

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    The name that was appropriated by writer Ian Fleming for his fictional British spy is James Bond. The real James Bond (1900 - 1989) was a leading American ornithologist who had been born in Philadelphia, PA and was an expert on birds living in the Caribbean. Regarding the two guys (Bond and Fleming), they didn’t have much in common. The only exception was that they both liked birds.

    After Fleming found a copy of the book "Birds of the West Indies" which had been written by James Bond, he had the name for the main character or protagonist of his first novel, Casino Royale (1953). Eventually, the real Bond sent a letter to Fleming. He wrote back and readily admitted what he had done. But, Fleming didn’t offer Bond any compensation. It was reported in the news that Fleming told Bond that he would gladly give him unlimited use of his name, Ian Fleming. He also suggested that if Bond discovered a new bird species, one that was “particularly horrible,” he could name the new species an “Ian Fleming”. This type of payback however ever happened.

    In an effort to either cash in on the notoriety or to set the record straight, Mary Bond (Jim’s wife) wrote a book entitled, "How 007 Got His Name". This book ended up being a hit in Great Britain. Sale of the book didn't really go beyond Britain.
     
  7. Bengal B

    Bengal B Founding Member

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    The longest word in any of the major English language dictionaries is pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis, a word that refers to a lung disease contracted from the inhalation of very fine silica particles, specifically from a volcano; medically, it is the same as silicosis.

    Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis was coined around 1935 to be the longest word; press reports by puzzle league members legitimized it somewhat. Today, the Oxford English Dictionary and several others list it.
     
  8. mctiger

    mctiger closet claustrophobic Staff Member

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    Guiness estimates that 93,000 liters of beer is lost every year in the beards of its consumers.
     
    GiantDuckFan likes this.
  9. Bengal B

    Bengal B Founding Member

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    Half of that is probably in the beards of ZZ Top and The Duck Commanders.
     
  10. Bengal B

    Bengal B Founding Member

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    On the U.S. 1961 - 1966 TV sit-com "The Dick Van Dyke Show, the actress, Rose Marie, played Sally Rogers. She was a female comedy TV writer (not a secretary or wife) on the show. From time to time, she takes comfort in her ginger tom cat ( Mr. Henderson) who is played by veteran cat actor Orangey

    The key phase here is veteran cat actor. Who knew there was such a thing. My cat can act. He does a great impression of a motionless ball of fur.
     

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