American Heros and Badasses!

Discussion in 'New Roundtable' started by watson1880, Jun 24, 2019.

  1. onceanlsufan

    onceanlsufan Founding Member

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    No they shouldnt
     
  2. Jmg

    Jmg Veteran Member

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    being a drug addict is a health problem, or simply a leisure activity, not a crime. imprisonment of peaceful drug users is maybe the worst human rights violation going on today on earth. cant put a homie in a cage because he likes to get high.
     
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  3. watson1880

    watson1880 Founding Member

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    Happy Birthday Chuck Norris!
    [​IMG]
     
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  4. watson1880

    watson1880 Founding Member

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    https://www.airforcetimes.com/news/...he-saved-80-lives-why-not-the-medal-of-honor/

    Senior Airman Dustin Temple, a combat controller with the 21st Special Tactics Squadron at Pope Field, North Carolina, showed extraordinary heroism in a September battle, repeatedly exposing himself to enemy fire to recover an injured soldier and resupply his team. He is the seventh airman to receive the Air Force Cross, the second-highest valor award, since 2001.
     
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  5. watson1880

    watson1880 Founding Member

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    [​IMG]
    Sgt. Roy W. Johnson
    CITATION:

    "The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Sergeant Roy W. Johnson (MCSN: 335908), United States Marine Corps Reserve, for extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty while serving as a Squad Leader in Company I, Third Battalion, Second Marines, SECOND Marine Division, during action against enemy Japanese forces at Betio Island, Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, on 20 November 1943. Detecting an imbedded, well-camouflaged enemy tank obstructing the advance of his squad and inflicting heavy casualties on his company, Sergeant Johnson valiantly risked his life in an effort to neutralize the hostile weapons. Crawling through withering fire, he successfully gained the turret and, after dropping a grenade within the enclosure, closed the hatch and sat on it until the ensuing explosion put the tank out of action. His brilliant initiative, daring aggressiveness and inspiring devotion to duty in the face of grave peril enabled our forces to move forward and deliver a devastating blow to opposing forces and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country."
     
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  6. el005639

    el005639 Founding Member

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    And americans today are scared of a virus that kills at most 2% of its victims.
     
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  7. watson1880

    watson1880 Founding Member

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    Major Brian Chontosh

    [​IMG]

    The President of the United States
    Takes Pleasure in Presenting
    The Navy Cross
    To

    Brian R. Chontosh
    First Lieutenant, United States Marine Corps

    For Services as Set Forth in the Following Citation:

    For extraordinary heroism as Combined Anti-Armor Platoon Commander, Weapons Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 25 March 2003. While leading his platoon north on Highway I toward Ad Diwaniyah, First Lieutenant Chontosh's platoon moved into a coordinated ambush of mortars, rocket propelled grenades, and automatic weapons fire. With coalition tanks blocking the road ahead, he realized his platoon was caught in a kill zone.

    He had his driver move the vehicle through a breach along his flank, where he was immediately taken under fire from an entrenched machine gun. Without hesitation, First Lieutenant Chontosh ordered the driver to advance directly at the enemy position enabling his .50 caliber machine gunner to silence the enemy.

    He then directed his driver into the enemy trench, where he exited his vehicle and began to clear the trench with an M16A2 service rifle and 9 millimeter pistol. His ammunition depleted, First Lieutenant Chontosh, with complete disregard for his safety, twice picked up discarded enemy rifles and continued his ferocious attack.

    When a Marine following him found an enemy rocket propelled grenade launcher, First Lieutenant Chontosh used it to destroy yet another group of enemy soldiers. When his audacious attack ended, he had cleared over 200 meters of the enemy trench, killing more than 20 enemy soldiers and wounding several others.[1]

    By his outstanding display of decisive leadership, unlimited courage in the face of heavy enemy fire, and utmost devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Chontosh reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
     
  8. watson1880

    watson1880 Founding Member

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    It's the Triple Ace's birthday!


     
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  9. el005639

    el005639 Founding Member

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    Marine Corporal John H. Pruitt, 78th Company, 6th Regiment, 2nd Division

    On October 3, 1918, Pruitt single-handedly rushed two German machine guns that were impeding his company’s advance. Sniping and killing both crews, shortly thereafter a total of 40 German soldiers in a dugout nearby surrendered to the lone Marine. Pruitt continued to snipe at the enemy until he was hit by shellfire and killed.

    Pruitt was posthumously awarded both the Army Medal of Honor and the Navy Medal of Honor for the same act. He is one of five Marines during World War I to hold such a distinction.
     
  10. el005639

    el005639 Founding Member

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    https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2020/aug/14/new-marine-best-ever-shot-parris-island-boot-camp/
    To put this in perspective best I ever shot was 231. If I had to guess he dropped 1 in the 4 ring in standing from 200 and first shot in the 4 ring from 500 due to windage adjustment.

    He had to shoot the following targets and ranges with iron sites on an m16.

    From 200 meters slow fire i..e 1 round a min
    5 rounds from standing
    5 rounds from standing to sitting
    5 rounds from standing to kneeling
    10 rounds from standing to sitting rapid fire all 10 in 1 min.

    From the 300 meter
    5 rounds from standing to sitting slow fire
    10 rounds rapid from standing to prone

    Slow fire target is a 10 in circle inner 5 inch circle worth 5 point
    Rapid fire target is silhouette of shoulders and head inner silhouette worth 5.

    From the 500 meter
    10 rounds standing to prone slow fire
    Target is waist and up man size target
     
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